Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Tuesday, July 18, 2023

Our Unit 20 bargaining team reports some progress at the table, recording three different tentative agreements that preserve rights we’ve fought for and won during previous contract campaigns. At the same time, we continue to negotiate on a number of issues and also received one rejection of a new proposal.

Still, overall progress is slow: today’s session was short, and we’re still waiting for the State’s bargaining team to join us in our efforts to bring a good contract to a conclusion.

Here are the tentative agreements we reached today. Each one is a rollover language. Of note, the pilot post-and-bid program for Medical Assistants (MA) in Stockton continues for another three years. During the next three years, the MA’s will follow a process identical to the Dental Assistants and bid yearly. And, table discussion about rest periods provides us with a better understanding of allowable breaks when our Unit 20 personnel are working shifts that go longer than 8 hours.

  • 19.3.20 Rest Periods (Unit 20)
  • 20.16.20 Post and Bid Procedure for Dental Assistant Positions, CDCR (Unit 20)
  • 20.18.20 Pilot Post and Bid for Medical Assistants at CHCF Stockton (Unit 20)

Negotiations continue on a number of key issues. Our economic issues have been moved to the master table.

Where does bargaining go from here?

Watch this July 13 video message from Irene Green, Local 1000 Vice President for Bargaining.

Unit-specific bargaining, along with negotiations at the master table, are being scheduled on a day-to-day basis. When there’s activity at the table, we’ll email and post the results, often on the same day. Click here to read all the recaps of bargaining activity.

What is the status of our contract?

As you know, we have not yet reached an overall tentative agreement on a new contract with the State. Our rights are still protected under the terms of our previous contract, which expired on June 30. Please remember that the $260 health care stipend had a June 30 sunset clause and will not be included in your August paycheck. That issue is part of our current negotiations.

You can read about your current contract rights in this mobile-friendly, searchable database.

What actions can I take to win a good contract?

As the bargaining team works to achieve meaningful progress at the table, it’s important that we keep our focus on Union solidarity and strength building. In order for our demands to be heard, SEIU Local 1000-represented employees need to stand together. So, we encourage you to sign up for our next action on July 25, 26, and 27 when we picket CalHR in Sacramento. Click here to register.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, July 10, 2023

There’s good news today in the form of two significant wins at the Unit 20 bargaining table. We reached tentative agreement with the state on two proposals that improve working conditions and expanded job and income opportunities for our represented employees.

Our bargaining team, representing the Medical and Social Services Specialists of Unit 20, reports a positive change in the state’s attitude at the table—a willingness to make progress and to bring the work of the Unit 20 table to fruition.

We made a big step in the fair distribution of overtime today: the state tentatively agreed to our proposal to form a Task Force to create a process for equitable treatment of our members at the Fremont Special Schools. Our Riverside facility has a well-working program, one we hope to replicate in Fremont.

We won stronger language in contract section 20.11.20, which governs the post and bid procedure for CNA positions at CalVet facilities. We increased the number of positions filled by employees through successful bids from 65% to 70%.

In other Unit 20 business today, a number of proposals and counterproposals were exchanged between our team and the state. We will continue our work to advance our members and to resolve outstanding proposals, including those affecting our pay and benefits.

As you know, we have not yet reached an overall tentative agreement on a new contract with the state. Remember, our rights are still protected under the terms of our previous contract, which expired on June 30.

Unit-specific bargaining, along with negotiations at the master table, are being scheduled on a day-to-day basis. When there’s activity at the table, we’ll email and post the results, often on the same day. Stay informed with all the bargaining news at our Contract Action Central web page.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Thursday, July 6, 2023

The Unit 20 bargaining team returned to the table on July 6 to negotiate with the State’s team. Once again, the State’s refusal to take their worker’s concerns seriously took center stage. In spite of this, SEIU Local 1000 members will continue to fight for their rights and needs in the workplace to be respected.

SEIU presented the following proposals to the State’s negotiating team today:

  • 8.26.20 CDCR – CCHCS Vacation Scheduling – Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN), Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA), and Medical Assistants, (MAs) (Unit 20) – Updated language that SEIU Local 1000 and the State worked on as task force back in 2019, which was created as a procedure afterward. The team wanted this language in the contract.
     
  • 10.5.20 Safety Orientation (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 accepted additional language that the State added to create a Joint Labor Management Committee (JLMC) to ensure that BU 20 employees are receiving safety orientation within the appropriate time frame.
     
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 proposed a rollover language since the State wasn’t willing to accept the new language to strengthen this process.
     
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 presented a counter proposal for this section to assist limited-term employees to enable them to do swaps for time off.

The State offered counter proposals for the following articles today –

  • X.XX.20 State Issued Cell Phones – The Schools for the Deaf (Fremont and Riverside) (Unit 20) – The state countered our initial proposal and rejected it completely.
     
  • 20.XXXX.X Assignment Preference Teaching Assistants– Special Schools (Unit 20)  The state countered our initial proposal and rejected it completely.
     
  • 9.20.20 Continuation of Flexible Benefits Election (Unit 20) – The state is sending this to the Master table and won’t discuss it at the Unit table.
     
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – The state is proposing rollover for this article section.
     
  • 19.XXXX.20 Overtime Distribution Task Force for Fremont Special Schools (Unit 20) – The state countered our new language proposal with the language of their own, however, the team needs to review it thoroughly before responding with a counterproposal.

We were able to reach the following tentative agreements today –

  • 8.26.20 CDCR – CCHCS Vacation Scheduling – Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN), Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA), and Medical Assistants, (MAs) (Unit 20) – Updated language that SEIU Local 1000 and the State worked on as task force back in 2019, which was created as a procedure afterward. The team wanted this language in the contract.
     
  • 10.5.20 Safety Orientation (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 accepted additional language that the State added to create a Joint Labor Management Committee (JLMC) to ensure that BU 20 employees are receiving safety orientation within the appropriate time frame.
     
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20) – Rollover.

While we’ve passed a lot of language to the State today focusing on overtime and counterproposals to expand opportunities for probational employees, the State has not provided anything material in return.

“It doesn’t seem like they’re willing to bargain,” said Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “We get back rejection, rejection, rejection, even in the face of the data that explains the situation in workplaces across the state.”

Unit 20 is still fighting for the Exchange of Time Off language to support employees during their year-long probationary period while battling with overwork and rising costs of living. This would be a win for both the State and employees.  Employees would be able to get the time off they need, and the State would know the shifts will be covered, which would save the State money as no overtime is required.

“They think that people up in Sacramento know more than people on the ground and the experts who have provided this data,” said Markovich.

One issue that the State’s negotiating team has consistently failed to provide meaningful input on is staff cell phones.

“Regarding cell phones, we’ve brought evidence that this issue goes back at least to 2015, and there’s been silence that whole time,” said Silas Wagner. “They deny that this is an issue and ignore the reality we live with.”

Working with students on field trips, to the store, and to and from their houses, staff have to use their personal phones and are encouraged to do so. The security of the staff’s personal information is a risk for teaching assistants and residential counselors, who are required to distribute their personal information to students, parents, and coworkers.

Workers at California Deaf Schools don’t have consistent distribution and access to resources like phones, video phones, and other resources across classifications. We are not supported by the State while we are working out and about with students. This is an unacceptable situation for all involved, according to Silas Wagner, a Unit 20 bargaining team member working at California School for the Deaf (CSD), Riverside.

“We have shown them stacks of data and reporting,” said Wagner. “The sad part is, when they say this can be resolved at the local level, we’ve made the efforts to do it that way. We’ve taken these issues to Joint Labor Management Committees (JLMCs) and to management directly. Nothing has happened.”

At hearing schools, the state provides walkie-talkies to staff, which cannot be used by any Deaf staff working at the Deaf schools. This obvious problem has not been addressed by management or the State’s bargaining team.

“The Unit 20 lead negotiator for the State repeatedly says she’s concerned that these issues are ongoing, but she still refuses to make a change,” said Wagner. “Something is not right here on the State’s side.”

The fight for respect in the workplace does not end at the negotiating table. Unit 20 employees are prepared to exert their rights in the workplace to demand an end to the policies which have created an untenable situation for workers and families across the state.

“Right now, it’s summer break,” said Wagner. “Our members are planning to stop using their personal phones at the start of the school year to protest this unfair policy. We’ll be grieving this every time it happens; we’ll be fighting this continuously; and we’ll be participating in the Union’s escalating actions as we address the failures of the State’s bargaining team.”

Unit 20 will return to the table as needed to complete a great contract for our members. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

If you have questions about actions planned at your worksite, contact the Member Resource Center (MRC) at 866.471.SEIU (7348), Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 26, 2023

This weekend, and again today, the Unit 20 bargaining team worked with the State to advance the Medical and Social Services workers we represent. While we made progress, the State continued to show frustrating bargaining behavior that didn’t align with our efforts to make positive change.

“All we’ve been seeing is the State wanting rollover language or to take rights away,” said Unit 20 Vice Chair Sarah Cooper. “They’re unwilling to do the back-and-forth; they want what they want, and it’s a contentious environment.”

Another example: Our fight to update our uniform allowance is being stifled; the State doesn’t seem concerned about a dollar figure that hasn’t been changed in 21 years.

Here are the tentative agreements we reached on Sunday and Monday; all are rollovers:

  • 8.27.20 Dependent Care Leave (Unit 20)
  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20)
  • 8.28 Continuing Education
  • 14.21 – Classification study

We made the following proposals to the State:

  • 12.9.20 Overtime Meal Allowance (Unit 20) – New language proposed for employees to receive additional meal allowance when required to work extended periods of time
  • 12.11.20 Uniform Replacement Allowance (Unit 20) – New language to raise the uniform allowance
  • 19.6.20 Show Up Time (Unit 20) – New language to hold management responsible to compensate an employee for four hours, if the staffing office doesn’t inform the employee they are not needed (this also applies to any trainings scheduled on an employee’s day off)
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – New language to strengthen the swap process for employees
  • 19.XXX.20 Floating (Unit 20) – New language to ensure that BU 20 employees aren’t made to cover work shifts for other bargaining unit classifications
  • 19.XXXX.20 Overtime Distribution Task Force for Fremont Special Schools (Unit 20) – New language to establish a Joint Management Labor Task Force to create a procedure on overtime distribution procedure for the Special Schools in Fremont
  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20) – Countered with rollover

Here are the proposals we received Sunday and Monday from the State:

  • 7.XX.20 Student Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors, Night Attendants and Teaching Assistants) (Unit 20) – The State rejected our efforts to secure a 40-hour week for our members, even if students are on holiday

We received four proposed rollovers

  • 8.27.20 Dependent Care Leave (Unit 20) – The State proposed rollover
  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20) – The State rejected the Union’s proposal to include the School for the Deaf, Fremont in this language and proposed rollover
  • 20.15.20 Post and Bid Procedure for CNA Positions, CDCR (CDCR, CCHCS, DJJ) (Unit 20) – The State proposed rollover
  • 20.16.20 Post and Bid Procedure for Dental Assistant Positions, CDCR (Unit 20) – The State proposed rollover

A number of outstanding proposals remain, mostly economic issues that have been moved to the master table. We also continue our joint effort with Unit 17 to resolve and advance our issues with mandatory and voluntary overtime.

With just a few days remaining before our contract expires, Unit 20 is on standby to meet once again with the State to resolve outstanding issues. When we meet, you’ll read it here first!

To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

Winning a good contract starts with you. Don’t just belong to the Union, participate.  Sign up for our Silent Protest March in Sacramento on June 29.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 19, 2023

We’re reporting today on two Unit 20 bargaining sessions—held on June 16 and 19.

While there was evidence of some movement at the Unit 20 table in these sessions, there remains a serious frustration with the State’s approach to bargaining with just ten days remaining before our current contract expires. Just today, we spent more than ten hours with the State’s team, and we reached no tentative agreements on behalf of the Medical and Social Service Specialists we represent. And that’s on the State, according to Silas Wagner, a member of our Unit 20 team who works at one of our state’s Special Schools:

“We feel that today’s session was a big waste of time,” said Wagner. “Our team has spent a great amount of effort crafting our proposals in response to our members’ priorities, yet, the State remains disengaged and less than fully responsive.”

“We’re being asked to give them information we presented over a month ago, multiple times. We have given them thoughtful input, and it seems that they’ve forgotten it.” Wagner added.

In just one example of the team’s frustration at the State’s response, after our initial SSA proposal, the State wanted to make sure our members were aware that the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is available. For members who are struggling to pay for meals, for medication, and for a roof over their head, “EAP is not a solution,” said Wagner. Yes, EAP can provide assistance to members in crisis but the real help would be if the State would provide a livable wage. When discussing SSAs, BU 20 Chair Heather Markovich asked the State “What are your state employee’s worth to you?”

At the same time, the State’s bargaining team is floating verbal responses to our proposals, rather than the traditional approach, which is we propose on paper, they should respond on paper.

“The State’s bargaining leadership is not listening to our members concerns with our new language proposals and is pushing back, offering instead to say ‘no’ or to take the easier approach by rolling over existing language, but we are not done fighting“ said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 bargaining chair.

Here’s a look at the progress Unit 20 made in the June 16 bargaining session:

Our Unit 20 team proposed to “roll over” (maintain previous contract language) on three sections:

  • 8.28.20 Continuing Education Leave (Unit 20)
  • 11.16.20 Alternate Range (AR) 40 (Unit 20)
  • 14.21.20 Classification Studies (Unit 20)

We reached two tentative agreements with the State on this day, both of which maintain previous contract wins from past campaigns:

  • 8.24.20 Department of Developmental Services/LVN Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20)
     
  • 8.30.20 Family Crisis Leave Bank, State Special Schools (Unit 20)

The State made one proposal to Unit 20:

  • 12.11.20 Uniform Replacement Allowance (Unit 20) – State proposed rollover language

On June 19, we achieved the following:

Unit 20’s team made the following proposals to the State:

  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20) – proposed new language to include the Fremont School for the Deaf
     
  • 10.38.20 Rest Areas (Unit 20) – new language to request that the State provide a refrigerator and microwave in break areas for all employees
     
  • 20.XXXX.X Assignment Preference Teaching Assistants– Special Schools (Unit 20) – new proposal to request that Teaching Assistants take a survey annually to request assignments for the school year so they have some choice in what they do each year (member choice)
     
  • 20.11.20 Post and Bid Procedure for CNA Positions: California Veterans Homes (Unit 20) – added new language to existing proposal to strengthen the article section
     
  • 20.18.20 Post and Bid Task Force for Medical Assistants at CHCF Stockton (Unit 20) – updated proposal to include all MAs statewide, not just at CHCF Stockton
     
  • 8.22.20 DSH Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – counterproposal with rollover language as the team didn’t want to accept the State’s language due to negative impact
     
  • 10.5.20 Safety Orientation (Unit 20) – counterproposal to ensure Unit 20 employees have management support until job orientation has been completed
     
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20) – counterproposal to ensure Unit 20 employees have management support until job orientation has been completed

Unit 20 received the following proposals from the State:

  • 20.12.20 Post and Bid Procedure for Vacant LVN Positions, CDCR (Unit 20) – State proposed rollover language (upcoming joint meeting with Unit 17)
     
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – State proposed rollover language (we proposed looser rules, RNs psy techs, probation)
     
  • 19.13.20 Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed new language that the team will need to review before responding
     
  • 19.14.20 Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20) – State proposed new language that the team will need to review before responding
     
  • 19.15.20 Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed new language that the team will need to review before responding
     
  • 19.21.20 Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed a new number system to mimic SEIU (19.21.20); other than that it’s rollover language
     
  • 19.22.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20) – State proposed a new number system to mimic SEIU (19.22.20); other than that it’s rollover language
     
  • 19.23.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed a new number system to mimic SEIU (19.23.20); other than that it’s rollover language
     
  • 19.XX.XX Mixed Shift Work Weeks (Unit 20) – a new proposal that the State rejected
     
  • 20.XX.XX Post and Bid Task Force for Pharmacy Technicians at CHCF Stockton (Unit 20) – a new proposal that the State rejected

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Unit 20 will return to the table on Monday, June 26. With just 10 days remaining before our contract expires, look for possible additional bargaining sessions through the weekend.

To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

If you are, help support bargaining teams by purpling up on Wednesday and attending our upcoming rally in Los Angeles on June 22.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 12, 2023

Negotiations continued today with the State after SEIU Local 1000’s march in Sacramento on June 8th.

The Unit 20 team went to the table on June 1st to negotiate with the State on the ongoing issues that our members have vocally demanded as we fight for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers.

“We started off slow today and we didn’t start until the afternoon, while we usually start at 11,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Bargaining Chair. In spite of technical issues on the State’s side, negotiations led to responses on a number of Unit 20’s proposals.

SEIU Local 1000 presented the following proposals to the State’s negotiating team today –

  • 8.23.20 Department of Veterans Affairs Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – counterproposal sent back where the State accepted our language and added some of their own that benefits Unit 20 classifications
     
  • 10.20.20 Assaultive Response Training (Unit 20) – counterproposal sent back where the State accepted our language and added some of their own
     
  • 7.XX.20 Student Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors, Night Attendants and Teaching Assistants) (Unit 20) – new proposal to ensure Unit 20 Night Attendants, Residential Counselors, and Teaching Assistants can receive a 40 hour workweek when there are student holidays (which doesn’t always happen presently)
     
  • 7.2.20 Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors and Night Attendants) (Unit 20) – counterproposal sent back where Unit 20 is accepting rollover language as the State wouldn’t accept BU 20’s language updates
     
  • X.XX.20 State Issued Cell Phones – The Schools for the Deaf (Fremont and Riverside) (Unit 20) – new proposal that will ensure that Unit 20 employees at the Schools for the Deaf (Freemont and Riverside) will be issued state cell phones to communicate with each other so they don’t have to use their personal cell phones

The State was able to reach the following tentative agreements today with the Union –

  • 8.23.20 Department of Veterans Affairs Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – counterproposal where the State accepted our language and added some of their own that benefits Unit 20 classifications
     
  • 10.20.20 Assaultive Response Training (Unit 20) – counterproposal where the State accepted our language and added some of their own
     
  • 7.2.20 Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors and Night Attendants) (Unit 20) – rollover language
     
  • 12.18.20 License or Certificate Renewal Fees (Unit 20) – rollover language

Additionally, the State offered counter proposals for the following articles today –

  • 8.22.20 DSH Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – the State countered with some new language that the team will review and respond to accordingly
     
  • 20.11.20 Post and Bid Procedure for CNA Positions: California Veterans Homes (Unit 20) – the State countered with some new language that the team will review and respond to accordingly

Finally, the State rejected two SEIU proposals today –

  • 20.XX.X Shift/Day Off Preference Teaching Assistants– Special Schools (Unit 20)
  • 8.XX.20 CDCR-CCHCS Vacation Scheduling – Pharmacy Technicians (Unit 20)

One issue that was addressed today was negotiations around Unit 20 employees at the Special Schools of California regarding cell phone usage. SEIU Local 1000-represented employees at the School for the Deaf are prohibited from using their personal cell phones per the school’s policy, however, management is requesting personal cell phone numbers to communicate via text. “We are asking the State to provide them with a work cell phone, to help in their work, and to protect their personal information,” said Markovich. “When they’re off duty, no one else should have access to their personal information.”

Although the bargaining team did receive several responses today, this has not yet met the expectation of the bargaining team, who are expecting more substantive proposals and language on post and bid, swaps, and mandatory overtime.

There is more work to be done to address the issues that Unit 20 members have prioritized in bargaining surveys and at town halls across the state.

“We haven’t gotten it all back, for example, we still need our vacation scheduling,” said Markovich. “We gave a lot of information, but we need more of the meat on serious issues. The State’s lead negotiator offered to meet with us on Thursday to address some of our outstanding articles.”

“We’re definitely moving,” said team member Oluwadamilola Kamson.  “The table was different today, and the State’s team was ready with proposals. My feeling is that we’re moving and that we got some of the TAs we wanted back. “We hope that we can continue this to catch up on the rest of the TAs and get our proposals returned.”

This movement comes after weeks of sluggish responses from the State’s negotiating team and a fight to receive back any of a large number of outstanding proposals.

“We’re finally starting to see movement from the State,” said Vice Chair Sarah Cooper. “Although we’re still waiting to hear back on some of our critical issues., it’s a good sign that the State is willing to meet with us on additional days this week to get this done before our contract expires.”

“I’m just hoping that next week we see the State return some of our outstanding proposals,” said Markovich. “If these issues weren’t important, we wouldn’t have proposed them.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, June 19. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

If you are, help support bargaining teams by purpling up on Wednesday and attending our upcoming rally in Los Angeles on June 22.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 5, 2023

There was some light at the end of the tunnel today in contract negotiations between our Unit 20 bargaining team and the State.

“It’s the most productive meeting we’ve had; we’re seeing a break in the log jam of unanswered proposals,” said Sarah Cooper, Vice Chair of Unit 20. “With three sessions remaining, we hope to bring home a good contract for our represented employees.”

Still, some of the most important proposals for our members—among them, post and bid and mandatory overtime—haven’t been responded to, and we continue to press for resolution.

As part of today’s session, we reached tentative agreement on a number of contract sections:

We won stronger language on 13.12.20 – Employment Opportunities, which will modernize the way the department posts and communicates job openings available to our members.

Following up on a joint commitment we made with the State during the last bargaining cycle, we reached tentative agreement on 8.25.20 – CDCR/CCHCS Vacation Scheduling and solidified our ability to reasonably schedule time off.

We reached tentative agreement on 20.13.20 – Shift/Day Off Preference of Assignment – Schools for the Deaf.  It preserves our previous, hard-won contract language.

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Unit 20 will return to the table on Monday, June 12. In addition, we’ve made it clear to State negotiators we’re ready to meet at any time to get our work done. As Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich said today, “We’ve got employees on this team who often work 16-hour days, and we’re good to go.”

To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Thursday, June 1, 2023

The Unit 20 team went to the table on June 1 to negotiate with the State on the issues that have been impacting workers across the state as we fight for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers.

BU 20 proposed the following new language to the State during today’s session:

  • 11.xx.20 Alternate Range Criteria Adjustment for Registered Dental Assistants

The State’s negotiating team proposed the following rollover sections to our bargaining team:

  • 10.38.20 Rest Areas (Unit 20)
  • 12.23.20 Laboratory Services and Deliveries (Unit 20)
  • 13.31.20   20/20 Programs (Unit 20)
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20)
  • 13.32.20 Education and Training Opportunities (Unit 20)
  • 13.33.20 Mandatory Training (Unit 20)
  • 13.34.20 Non-Mandatory Training (Unit 20)

Additionally, the State offered a counterproposal to the following sections:

  • 10.20.20 Assaultive Response Training (Unit 20)

The State agreed to SEIU Local 1000’s language change and added additional language, which the BU 20 team will review and respond to the State at the appropriate time.

  • 7.2.20 Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors and Night Attendants) (Unit 20) the State did not accept our language changes and countered with rollover.

Finally, a tentative agreement was reached today on the following new language section:

  • 10.25.20 Infectious Disease Control (Unit 20)

The State did reach a tentative agreement on the language change proposed by Local 1000, in section 10.25.20, expanding the infection disease control language to include CCHCS and CDE. This gives our members the right to information on outbreaks in their workplace.

Additionally, the team presented new language adjusting the range criteria for Registered Dental Assistants. These underpaid and understaffed workers have demanded a pathway to reach their maximum pay in a shorter amount of time. The team proposed new language to the State today to change the amount of time it takes to go from one range to another range from 10 years to 4 years. This was in direct response to the survey feedback and town halls that were attended by the Registered Dental Assistants.

“Previously, Registered Dental Assistants took about 15 years to get to their max pay,” said Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “We presented to the State that all dental assistants should have the same process for reaching their maximum pay.”

“The State needs to take action on our articles,” said team member Silas Wagner. “We’ll be back at the table on Monday with the same demands, and we will continue to fight for what our members deserve. We aren’t going to roll over in the face of delays.”

While the State presented the team with 8 rollover proposals today, there continue to be delays in negotiations on critical issues faced by Unit 20 workers.

“We need to negotiate over the exchange of time language, vacation time, post and bid, and mandatory overtime,” said Markovich. “We need the meat, not the crumbs.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 22, 2023

While our Unit 20 bargaining team continues to work with the State by presenting proposals that advance the wages and working conditions of our Medical and Social Services Specialists, the State remains largely unresponsive to those proposals.

“Negotiation is a two-way street, an exchange of information, and we’re still waiting,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Chair. “We’re doing our part, but without feedback on our proposals, there’s no opportunity for progress, and we’re not solving the issues facing our members.”

The numbers are stark: to date, there are 39 outstanding proposals that remain unanswered. We’ve reached tentative agreement with the State on just 12 contract sections, and one more is in progress.

We’ve told the State that time is running out. With no bargaining scheduled for next Monday (Memorial Day), only 4 regularly scheduled sessions remain before the contract expires.

“We’ve asked the State what they’d do if the roles were reversed and asked them to imagine that they weren’t getting the input necessary to respond to,” added Chair Markovich. “Their response was, basically, ‘we’re doing our due diligence’ without any promise of a change of behavior.”

Still, our team is moving forward. We reached tentative agreement on three proposals, a number of weeks after we presented them:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks (Unit 20)
  • 12.22.20 – State Special School Field Trip Expenses (Unit 20)
  • 15.4.20 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 20)

These “rollovers” preserve and protect rights from previous contract wins. We’re awaiting a response on 39 additional proposals.

There will be no bargaining on Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day). Unit 20 returns to the table in two weeks, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 22, 2023

While our Unit 20 bargaining team continues to work with the State by presenting proposals that advance the wages and working conditions of our Medical and Social Services Specialists, the State remains largely unresponsive to those proposals.

“Negotiation is a two-way street, an exchange of information, and we’re still waiting,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Chair. “We’re doing our part, but without feedback on our proposals, there’s no opportunity for progress, and we’re not solving the issues facing our members.”

The numbers are stark: to date, there are 39 outstanding proposals that remain unanswered. We’ve reached tentative agreement with the State on just 12 contract sections, and one more is in progress.

We’ve told the State that time is running out. With no bargaining scheduled for next Monday (Memorial Day), only 4 regularly scheduled sessions remain before the contract expires.

“We’ve asked the State what they’d do if the roles were reversed and asked them to imagine that they weren’t getting the input necessary to respond to,” added Chair Markovich. “Their response was, basically, ‘we’re doing our due diligence’ without any promise of a change of behavior.”

Still, our team is moving forward. We reached tentative agreement on three proposals, a number of weeks after we presented them:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks (Unit 20)
  • 12.22.20 – State Special School Field Trip Expenses (Unit 20)
  • 15.4.20 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 20)

These “rollovers” preserve and protect rights from previous contract wins. We’re awaiting a response on 39 additional proposals.

There will be no bargaining on Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day). Unit 20 returns to the table in two weeks, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 22, 2023

While our Unit 20 bargaining team continues to work with the State by presenting proposals that advance the wages and working conditions of our Medical and Social Services Specialists, the State remains largely unresponsive to those proposals.

“Negotiation is a two-way street, an exchange of information, and we’re still waiting,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Chair. “We’re doing our part, but without feedback on our proposals, there’s no opportunity for progress, and we’re not solving the issues facing our members.”

The numbers are stark: to date, there are 39 outstanding proposals that remain unanswered. We’ve reached tentative agreement with the State on just 12 contract sections, and one more is in progress.

We’ve told the State that time is running out. With no bargaining scheduled for next Monday (Memorial Day), only 4 regularly scheduled sessions remain before the contract expires.

“We’ve asked the State what they’d do if the roles were reversed and asked them to imagine that they weren’t getting the input necessary to respond to,” added Chair Markovich. “Their response was, basically, ‘we’re doing our due diligence’ without any promise of a change of behavior.”

Still, our team is moving forward. We reached tentative agreement on three proposals, a number of weeks after we presented them:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks (Unit 20)
  • 12.22.20 – State Special School Field Trip Expenses (Unit 20)
  • 15.4.20 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 20)

These “rollovers” preserve and protect rights from previous contract wins. We’re awaiting response on 39 additional proposals.

There will be no bargaining on Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day). Unit 20 returns to the table in two weeks, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 15, 2023

Our bargaining teams have returned to the table this week, fighting for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers. Our Bargaining Unit 20 negotiating team went to the table on May 15 to negotiate financial matters that impact these vulnerable and underpaid classifications. Subject matter experts in the unit discussed the issues they experience in the workplace and explained in detail to the State the consequences of years of short staffing and low pay.

During today’s bargaining session, the team proposed four sections for “rollover,” maintaining important workplace protections secured in previous contracts:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks
  • 11.61.20 – Split Shift Differential
  • 11.63.20 – Certified Nursing Assistant/EMT Pay Differential
  • 12.18.20 – License or Certificate Renewal Fees

We proposed the four sections below with new language to reflect changes we want to see to our contract:

  • 10.5.20 – Safety Orientation
  • 11.1.20 – Special Salary Adjustments
  • 11.60.20 – LVN Recruitment and Retention
  • 11.62.20 – Dental Assistant Registration Differential

Additionally, we made a counter proposal in response to the State’s first counter proposal for the following section:

  • 13.12.20 – Employment Opportunities

Finally, the State and the Union reached a tentative agreement on the following rollover sections:

  • 19.18.20 – Rescinding Approved Time Off
  • 19.31.20 – Split Shifts

Language proposed today about safety orientation by the bargaining team reflected the same concept as BU 17. The bargaining teams are trying to align the language of Units 17 and 20. “We work side-by-side with each other,” said Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “LVNs, CNAs, RNs, and Medical Assistants working on the same unit should have the same protections.”

Today, the bargaining team proposed special salary adjustments for Unit 20 employees, asking for individual pay raises for some of the most impacted and lowest paid classifications. “We let them know our members should not have to suffer anxiety about homelessness or paying for food instead of rent,” said Markovich.

These issues are at the heart of the State’s current crisis of vacancies in positions across California. “If they don’t pay and respect us, they will run out of employees,” said Markovich.

“If the wages are not raised, no one will come work for the state.”

The focus at the table on economics is giving voice to the concerns of state workers who have struggled for recognition of their needs for years. Experts spoke about their experiences in job roles across California, including a Senior Clinical Laboratory Technologist, an X-ray technician, and SSA-I (ASL interpreters) from the Department of Rehabilitation and School for the Deaf in Riverside.

“We are dealing with ASL proficiency,” said bargaining team member Silas Wagner. “It takes years of experience to become an interpreter with the skills necessary for the unique needs and educations levels of our deaf state employees. Someone who has 6 months experience, which is listed in the job description, will be woefully unprepared and overwhelmed on the job.”

These jobs are in-demand positions; not everyone can be an interpreter and years of experience are needed. The State knows this but has refused to pay these qualified professionals what they’re worth. “They work hard,” said Wagner. “Those in these roles need to be taken seriously.”

The State also heard from a Senior Clinical Lab Technologist and an X-Ray Technician in regard to how their low pay has impacted new hires and retention. The high vacancy rate has increased their workload; instead of covering one facility they have to cover multiple facilities. The Senior Clinical Lab Technologist must have a license by the State Department of Health Services. In order to obtain that license, they must have a bachelor’s degree and a major in clinical laboratory science. Due to the low pay, most people with this license seek higher paying positions outside of state service.

Similarly, the X-Ray Technicians also have a high proficiency level for their job along with a license. Due to low staffing levels, they also service multiple facilities while they were originally hired to service just one facility. This also causes patients to be transferred to outside facilities if there is no X-Ray Technician on duty as they are at another facility. The cost of transporting patients along with their escorts is extremely high, which is costing the state unnecessary funds.

In the CNA classification alone, there are 749 vacant jobs across the state. Uncompetitive wages have meant that the state can’t hire, further exacerbating the problems. In order to solve the state’s financial issues regarding their workforce, Unit 20 employees need to be paid a fair and competitive wage.

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, May 22. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

Bargaining Unit 17 & 20 Recap: Tuesday, May 9, 2023

Happy Nurses’ Week from your Bargaining Unit 17 (BU 17) and Bargaining Unit 20 (BU 20) Bargaining Unit Negotiating Committees (BUNC). While we celebrate the work nurses do across the country, SEIU Local 1000-represented nurses went to the table on May 9 to focus on Mandatory Overtime and Voluntary Overtime, which affect our nurses statewide.

Of primary concern to almost all state nurses is the issue of Mandatory Overtime (MOT). “This morning, BU 17 and 20 together met with the State to pass our voluntary and mandatory overtime article sections,” said Unit 17 Chair Vanessa Seastrong. “Today at the table a large volume of new proposals were presented from both bargaining teams to address these issues. We passed a total of 10 proposals, 4 for Unit 17 and 6 for Unit 20,” said Seastrong. “As we expected, the State received these MOT article sections but didn’t ask many clarifying questions, and we are still awaiting a counter proposal.”

BU 17 proposed the following article sections containing new language regarding Mandatory Overtime (MOT):

  • Article 19.14.17 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.15.17 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling (Excluding CDCR) (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.22.17 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.23.17 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling (Excluding CDCR) (Unit 17)

BU 20 proposed these article sections addressing MOT for their unit as well:

  • Article 19.13.20 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.14.20 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.15.20 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.21.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.22.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.23.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20)

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Currently, a holdover of less than two hours is not counted as mandatory overtime. “This is an inconvenience and demoralizing for many of our members,” said BU 17 Alternate Vice Chair Bob Mutebi. “An hour means a lot of someone’s day. Our new proposal is to have a holdover of one hour to be counted as MOT.”

These issues led to the team proposing a change to the existing MOT language. “We proposed that the State reduce the number of mandatory overtime shifts by one a year until we get to zero,” said BU 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “We also proposed language to strengthen the voluntary overtime process.”

Currently, BU 17 RNs can be mandated for two overtime shifts per month, while BU 20 CNAs and LVNs have three. “We want to reduce this down to 1 for RNs and 2 for LVNs and CNAs,” said Seastrong. “We would continue to reduce MOT by one shift per year until 2025 when Unit 17 and 20 will both have zero.”

Other changes to the article sections strengthen contract language so that our workers can take the shifts that they want to work and gives state employees preference over external registry. “We want the state to address these article sections,” said Seastrong. “For the last three years, we’ve been in a Mandatory Overtime Task Force, and nothing was done. Without language to make them get this problem under control, we don’t think this issue will be solved. The state has violated this agreement in the past, so stronger language and protections are needed.”

Another ongoing issue addressed during the joint session was language proposed by the units that ensured that BU 17 and BU 20 nurses cannot be mandated into another bargaining unit position. “Unit 17 and Unit 20 are being mandated into other BU positions. “We are being used to plug gaps in the state’s workforce,” said Mutebi.

“Today, state workers stood up and told the State that this practice accounts for the huge turnover in the state’s workforce,” said Mutebi. “This represents a huge disrespect for our LVNs, who are forced to cover for workers making more money when they themselves are not paid equally,” said Markovich.

To ensure that these protections are enforced, bargaining units proposed language that includes penalties for the state when these terms are violated. “We included in this proposal that when mandatory overtime shifts are required of state workers after we bring them down to zero, the state will have to pay a penalty of double-time for any mandated shift,” said Markovich.

The two units worked together to present these major proposals to the State. These issues have been ongoing for years while managers have ignored the problem. By joining together, the two units were able to support each other and provide insight to the State regarding the impacts on nurses. “Mandatory overtime has a huge impact on nursing staff, so we have to come together to fight this issue, because it affects all of us, especially after all of us were working mandatory overtime during COVID,” said BU 20 Vice Chair Sarah Cooper.

The fight for this important protection is on. “The nurses’ actions in the workplace are what brought the State to the table on this issue in 2019,” said Seastrong. “We need to see that same energy now to move the State to take our proposals seriously. We need actions in the workplace so the State can see how bad the nurses want mandatory overtime to go away.”

“In 24-hour facilities, there is no separation between these units,” said Mutebi. “Neither of us can say our job is complete without each other. When we come together at the table, it shows the synergy of these two units fighting the injustices that the state is trying to put on our membership.”

In addition to article sections passed during the joint session, Unit 17 proposed the following rollover sections:

  • Article 19.4.17 – Meal Periods (Unit 17) 
  • Article 19.6.17 – Show Up Time (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.7.17 – Report Preparation Time (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.9.17 – Exchange of Days Off (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.16.17 – Change in Shift Assignment (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.17.17 – Mixed Shift Work Weeks (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.19.17 – Work Week Group (WWG) Definitions (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.24.17 – Floating (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.25.17 – Travel Time (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.26.17 – Workweek Correctional Institutions (Unit 17)

Finally, the State offered tentative agreements to the following article sections.

  • Article 8.13.17 – Court Appearances and/or Subpoenas (Excludes Unit 17)
  • Article 13.2.17 – Informal Performance Discussions (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.6.17 – Performance Appraisal (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.9.17 – Letters of Instruction (LOI)/Work Improvement Discussion (WID) (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.12.17 – Employment Opportunities (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.28.17 – Education and Training Opportunities and Resources (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.29.17 – Research Projects (Unit 17)
  • Article 14.4.17 – Duty Statements/Post Orders and Work Instructions (Unit 17)
  • Article 15.4.17 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 17)

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

After their morning session bargaining alongside Unit 20, Unit 17 had an active day at the table, focusing on rollover language. “It was a busy day on our end,” said Unit 17 Chair Vanessa Seastrong.

“We have given the State 61 article sections of new language and rollover, and we have only received 18 rollover back in total,” said Seastrong. “While receiving the TAs today was a good sign, the State still needs to start dealing with our new language and not just rollover. We have a number of easy article sections with simple changes that are still under review by the State.”

While the State moves through rollover language, SEIU Local 1000 members are ready to fight for a contract that represents the needs identified in their bargaining surveys and Town Hall meetings.

“We’re hoping that the State will come back and begin the negotiations of bargaining, not just tentative agreements for rollovers,” said Seastrong. “We want to get into the details of language changes. We are focused on action to move the State. Nurses are ready in workplaces across the state to take action to support our bargaining team.”

Unit 17’s next meeting with the State to win a contract that Respects Us, Protects Us, and Pays Us is set for May 16. To read about what happened in Monday’s Bargaining Unit 11, 15, 20, and 21 sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today

Bargaining Unit 20 – Recap: Monday, May 8, 2023

Our bargaining teams are back at the table this week, fighting for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers. Our Bargaining Unit 20 (BU 20) Bargaining Unit Negotiating Team, or BUNC, went to the table on May 8 to negotiate with the State over the unique challenges faced by Medical & Social Services Specialists working for the state. With subject matter experts and members from the State Special Schools presenting on issues in their workplaces, we are showing the State the leadership role they play in providing services to the public.

During today’s bargaining session, BU 20 proposed four sections for “rollover,” maintaining important workplace protections secured in previous contracts.

Additionally, we proposed four articles with new language to reflect changes we want to see to our contract:

  • Article 7.2.20 – Holidays- State Special Schools
  • Article 11.2.20 – State Special School Recruitment and Retention Differentials
  • Article 19.32.20 – Overtime Distribution at the California State Special Schools
  • Article 20.13.20 – Shifts/Day off Preference of Assignment Counselors – Special Schools
  • Article 20.XX. X – Shifts/Day off Preference of Assignment Teaching Assistants – Special Schools

Finally, the State agreed to the following contract sections, achieving a tentative agreement as we continue bargaining:

  • Article 9.19.20 – Light/Limited Duty Assignments
  • Article 11.19.20 – Recruitment and Retention 
  • Article 20.17.20 – Post and Bid Procedure for Residential Care Specialist (RCS) Positions: California Veterans Homes

 You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

“We had a pretty good day,” said Bargaining Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “Today we focused on the School for the Deaf in Fremont and Riverside along with the School for the Blind in Fremont. We asked the State to include new language for a recruitment and retention differential that raises the dollar amount for people currently receiving this in BU 20.”

After addressing rollover language, BUNC member Silas Wagner presented on the ongoing financial crisis for workers in the Bay Area. With inflation rising alongside rent and housing costs, workers are in crisis at the California School for the Deaf in Riverside and Fremont along with the California School for the Blind in Fremont, as well as the communities surrounding these schools.

“In my presentation, I talked about the importance of Deaf culture and Deaf community,” said Wagner. “We want to live in the cities where our Deaf schools are.  These cities have become unaffordable and the Deaf community is disappearing. By living near the schools where we work, we are able to create a Deaf community in which Deaf students are able to thrive.”

However, the State has neglected to address the issues of low wages and increased cost of living faced by the Deaf community in Fremont for many years. “Our classifications are some of the lowest paid, and I wanted to highlight how these low wages are impacting the Deaf community,” said Wagner. “We want people to live near the school and keep our community intact. To put a roof over your head in most situations costs more than people are paid. Everyone’s in the red in Fremont; Unit 20 members can’t afford small studio apartments.”

While cost of living is a crisis across the state, it is particularly impacting workers and community members around these schools. “The cost of living may not be the state’s fault,” said Wagner. “But they need to face the reality that the cost of living is not met by the salary we are provided. Fremont is the most expensive city in California. The second is San Jose. It’s shocking to see that this is where our community is trying to survive without the support of the state.”

These impacts can be mitigated if the State listens to their union workforce’s demands for change in our next contract. Our subject matter experts presented on the issues each of their classifications face, including night attendants, residential counselors, teaching assistants, and sign language interpreters.

“We had representatives from each of the classifications talk about the financial struggles that are associated with Bay Area living and how the salary affects the ability of members to maintain their physical, mental, and emotional health. It will impact the services provided to the children going to the Blind and Deaf schools,” said Wagner. “They talked about the love and commitment that they have for the students, sharing their knowledge about Deaf culture.”

 “I really want to thank the subject matter experts for joining today,” said Wagner. “We are so grateful for the support from the team from the State Special Schools for supporting each other and their coworkers and all the effort they put into their presentations today.”

The fight for respect, protection, and pay requires that all state workers stand together in our demands for a strong contract. Bargaining Unit 20 members spoke with a unified voice at the table and helped show the State that our members are united in our struggle.

Unit 20 returns to the table Tuesday, May 9 along with BU 17 to discuss overtime and next week, on Monday, May 15. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, click here for our Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org.

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 1, 2023

We are entering our third week of bargaining with the State for a contract that respects, protects, and pays the workers who have kept California running through chaotic and unprecedented times. Our Unit 20 (BU 20) Bargaining Unit Negotiating Committee (BUNC) went to the table on May 1st, International Worker’s Day, prepared to fight for our members and the safety and security of the people they serve.

“We passed a lot of language over to the State for approval, including vacation scheduling language from the task forces, as well as making minor tweaks to language around infection control, assaultive response training which includes de-escalation techniques. We also proposed expanding existing language on infectious diseases training to the California Department of Education (CDE) as well.”

These are all meaningful changes that respond to the major disruptions that the State of California has gone through over the last three years of the pandemic. The State, however, does not share the same urgency for our member’s needs.

Unit 20 has 11 outstanding provisions from previous weeks, not including the 5 additional rollovers and 7 new proposals passed today, pending responses from the State. “I felt like there wasn’t sincerity on the State’s part,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 BUNC Chair. “We started the day and asked what they had for us. They told us they had one rollover.”

After multiple weeks, the State is still slow to respond to these issues or even ask clarifying questions. “It’s hard to say what’s going on behind closed doors,” said Markovich. “When we asked them if they had any questions or comments about what we sent, they said they were still reviewing.”

Unit 20 was able to reach a Tentative Agreement with the State on one rollover provision from our previous contract, 13.18.20 – Professional Practice. You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, May 8th. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, click here for our Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org.

If you’re not already an SEIU Local 1000 member, join us today.

Unit 20 Bargaining Summary: Monday, April 24, 2023

Bargaining has entered its second week for our Unit 20 Bargaining Unit Negotiating Committee (BUNC), representing LVNs, CNAs, Teaching Assistants, Dental Assistants, Registered Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienists, Pharmacy Technicians, Laboratory Technologists, Physical Therapists, Counselors, and many other classifications working across California.

On April 24th, the Unit 20 BUNC went to the table to continue unit-specific negotiations with the State.  We presented four contract articles to the State for “rollover,” signaling our desire that the existing language remains unchanged, keeping in place the hard-won rights from previous contract campaigns. The State agreed, and thus, a “tentative agreement” was reached on these three articles:

5.18.20   –         Labor Management Committee, California School for the Deaf, Riverside
10.32.20 –         Information Regarding Medical Condition
21.22.20 –         Licensure/Certification

The State also returned a proposal from last week on continuing education. “When they asked why this proposal was an issue for us, we went into our surveys and were able to provide specific cases from responding workers,” said BUNC Chair Heather Markovich. “The State was pushing back on costs on this issue, but we wanted them to understand that by increasing the knowledge of our workforce, we can both support the quality care to our patients and the career opportunities workers have.”

In addition, the Unit 20 ream proposed new language today, centered around the Post and Bid procedure, which affects our certified nurse assistants and LVNs in all our locations. “This has a very broad impact,” said Markovich. “The Post and Bid process allows members to choose shifts, work area, and days off based on seniority. This allows our workers to better manage their work-life balance as they see fit. We have multiple people who have spouses or significant others who use the post and bid process so that they can minimize childcare costs, which remain high across the state.”

As we present more and more articles to the State, negotiations will continue to evolve, but our goals are clear. Our members need more support from their employer, and we need to maintain and expand our protections in the workplace. “This meeting was a little more tense than last week,” said Markovich. “They had a lot of questions for us, but we handled it well as a team.” 

The tensions at the table are in part due to our bargaining team holding the State accountable to its workers. After a proposal is passed across the table to the State, their negotiators have a week to review it and respond. “We’re putting a lot more pressure on the State to respond to us,” said Sarah Cooper, BUNC Alternate Vice Chair. “The State sometimes delays passing back counteroffers and tentative agreements. They started the day saying they had nothing to give us and that we may receive one agreed on proposal by the end of the day.”

In spite of the State’s pessimistic outlook, the Unit 20 BUNC was able to use our member’s responses to surveys, town hall meetings, and other comments to keep the meeting productive and fight for our member’s rights. “Heather pushed and demanded answers after they had a week to do their research,” said Cooper. “By the end of the day, we had three rollovers agreed to and proposed new language.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, May 1st. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, click here for our Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org.

If you’re not already an SEIU Local 1000 member, join us today.


Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, April 17, 2023

After kicking off bargaining for our “master table” session last week, members across the state are making their voices heard as we demand a strong contract that Respects, Protects, and Pays the employees that kept California running for the last three years.

On April 17, Bargaining Unit 20 (BU 20), went to the table to begin their unit-specific negotiations with the State. BU 20, which represents medical and social services specialists, including LVNs, CNAs, Teaching Assistants, Laboratory Technologists, Physical Therapists, and Counselors, has faced some extremely challenging conditions as they navigated COVID-19 and the State and management’s response.

“Members drive this process, and we follow their directions,” said Heather Markovich, Bargaining Unit 20 Chair. “There’s a lot riding on this, but we came in prepared thanks to our research, the strength of our team, and the time we spent getting to understand our strategy. We’re very cohesive.”

During Monday morning’s session, our team presented a number of contract articles for “rollover,” a term you’ll hear used to describe parts of the contract that don’t require negotiation this cycle. Today’s rollover articles include maintaining our Labor Management committee at California School for the Deaf, Riverside; our return-to-work “light/limited duty” program for employees incapacitated due to illness or injury; and a continuation of the Flexible Benefits Program (FlexElect). Setting these protections aside during bargaining ensures that we will be able to address the ongoing issues without risking these workplace protections crucial to medical and social services.

We presented four new proposals in the afternoon that contained new language and new protections for members. Two of these proposals focused on time-off exchanges and continuing our education leave programs, built off existing language to strengthen the protections we have in our worksites.

Additionally, we presented two new proposals designed to address the ongoing problem of mixed shifts. BU 20 represented employees often find themselves working most days on one shift but with some days assigned shifts earlier or later in the day. Additionally, we proposed a task force for pharmacy technicians in Stockton, including post and bid language. If successful, pharmacy technicians could choose their workplace and pick their schedules.

“Our focus is on addressing the issues our members identified in our bargaining surveys, town halls, and meetings at worksites across the state, said Markovich, who works as a Licensed Vocational Nurse at the California Medical Facility. “We’re members just like all of our coworkers. The input from the surveys and town halls leads where we go in negotiations.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, April 24. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Tuesday, July 18, 2023

Our Unit 20 bargaining team reports some progress at the table, recording three different tentative agreements that preserve rights we’ve fought for and won during previous contract campaigns. At the same time, we continue to negotiate on a number of issues and also received one rejection of a new proposal.

Still, overall progress is slow: today’s session was short, and we’re still waiting for the State’s bargaining team to join us in our efforts to bring a good contract to a conclusion.

Here are the tentative agreements we reached today. Each one is a rollover language. Of note, the pilot post-and-bid program for Medical Assistants (MA) in Stockton continues for another three years. During the next three years, the MA’s will follow a process identical to the Dental Assistants and bid yearly. And, table discussion about rest periods provides us with a better understanding of allowable breaks when our Unit 20 personnel are working shifts that go longer than 8 hours.

  • 19.3.20 Rest Periods (Unit 20)
  • 20.16.20 Post and Bid Procedure for Dental Assistant Positions, CDCR (Unit 20)
  • 20.18.20 Pilot Post and Bid for Medical Assistants at CHCF Stockton (Unit 20)

Negotiations continue on a number of key issues. Our economic issues have been moved to the master table.

Where does bargaining go from here?

Watch this July 13 video message from Irene Green, Local 1000 Vice President for Bargaining.

Unit-specific bargaining, along with negotiations at the master table, are being scheduled on a day-to-day basis. When there’s activity at the table, we’ll email and post the results, often on the same day. Click here to read all the recaps of bargaining activity.

What is the status of our contract?

As you know, we have not yet reached an overall tentative agreement on a new contract with the State. Our rights are still protected under the terms of our previous contract, which expired on June 30. Please remember that the $260 health care stipend had a June 30 sunset clause and will not be included in your August paycheck. That issue is part of our current negotiations.

You can read about your current contract rights in this mobile-friendly, searchable database.

What actions can I take to win a good contract?

As the bargaining team works to achieve meaningful progress at the table, it’s important that we keep our focus on Union solidarity and strength building. In order for our demands to be heard, SEIU Local 1000-represented employees need to stand together. So, we encourage you to sign up for our next action on July 25, 26, and 27 when we picket CalHR in Sacramento. Click here to register.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, July 10, 2023

There’s good news today in the form of two significant wins at the Unit 20 bargaining table. We reached tentative agreement with the state on two proposals that improve working conditions and expanded job and income opportunities for our represented employees.

Our bargaining team, representing the Medical and Social Services Specialists of Unit 20, reports a positive change in the state’s attitude at the table—a willingness to make progress and to bring the work of the Unit 20 table to fruition.

We made a big step in the fair distribution of overtime today: the state tentatively agreed to our proposal to form a Task Force to create a process for equitable treatment of our members at the Fremont Special Schools. Our Riverside facility has a well-working program, one we hope to replicate in Fremont.

We won stronger language in contract section 20.11.20, which governs the post and bid procedure for CNA positions at CalVet facilities. We increased the number of positions filled by employees through successful bids from 65% to 70%.

In other Unit 20 business today, a number of proposals and counterproposals were exchanged between our team and the state. We will continue our work to advance our members and to resolve outstanding proposals, including those affecting our pay and benefits.

As you know, we have not yet reached an overall tentative agreement on a new contract with the state. Remember, our rights are still protected under the terms of our previous contract, which expired on June 30.

Unit-specific bargaining, along with negotiations at the master table, are being scheduled on a day-to-day basis. When there’s activity at the table, we’ll email and post the results, often on the same day. Stay informed with all the bargaining news at our Contract Action Central web page.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Thursday, July 6, 2023

The Unit 20 bargaining team returned to the table on July 6 to negotiate with the State’s team. Once again, the State’s refusal to take their worker’s concerns seriously took center stage. In spite of this, SEIU Local 1000 members will continue to fight for their rights and needs in the workplace to be respected.

SEIU presented the following proposals to the State’s negotiating team today:

  • 8.26.20 CDCR – CCHCS Vacation Scheduling – Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN), Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA), and Medical Assistants, (MAs) (Unit 20) – Updated language that SEIU Local 1000 and the State worked on as task force back in 2019, which was created as a procedure afterward. The team wanted this language in the contract.
     
  • 10.5.20 Safety Orientation (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 accepted additional language that the State added to create a Joint Labor Management Committee (JLMC) to ensure that BU 20 employees are receiving safety orientation within the appropriate time frame.
     
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 proposed a rollover language since the State wasn’t willing to accept the new language to strengthen this process.
     
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 presented a counter proposal for this section to assist limited-term employees to enable them to do swaps for time off.

The State offered counter proposals for the following articles today –

  • X.XX.20 State Issued Cell Phones – The Schools for the Deaf (Fremont and Riverside) (Unit 20) – The state countered our initial proposal and rejected it completely.
     
  • 20.XXXX.X Assignment Preference Teaching Assistants– Special Schools (Unit 20)  The state countered our initial proposal and rejected it completely.
     
  • 9.20.20 Continuation of Flexible Benefits Election (Unit 20) – The state is sending this to the Master table and won’t discuss it at the Unit table.
     
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – The state is proposing rollover for this article section.
     
  • 19.XXXX.20 Overtime Distribution Task Force for Fremont Special Schools (Unit 20) – The state countered our new language proposal with the language of their own, however, the team needs to review it thoroughly before responding with a counterproposal.

We were able to reach the following tentative agreements today –

  • 8.26.20 CDCR – CCHCS Vacation Scheduling – Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN), Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA), and Medical Assistants, (MAs) (Unit 20) – Updated language that SEIU Local 1000 and the State worked on as task force back in 2019, which was created as a procedure afterward. The team wanted this language in the contract.
     
  • 10.5.20 Safety Orientation (Unit 20) – SEIU Local 1000 accepted additional language that the State added to create a Joint Labor Management Committee (JLMC) to ensure that BU 20 employees are receiving safety orientation within the appropriate time frame.
     
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20) – Rollover.

While we’ve passed a lot of language to the State today focusing on overtime and counterproposals to expand opportunities for probational employees, the State has not provided anything material in return.

“It doesn’t seem like they’re willing to bargain,” said Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “We get back rejection, rejection, rejection, even in the face of the data that explains the situation in workplaces across the state.”

Unit 20 is still fighting for the Exchange of Time Off language to support employees during their year-long probationary period while battling with overwork and rising costs of living. This would be a win for both the State and employees.  Employees would be able to get the time off they need, and the State would know the shifts will be covered, which would save the State money as no overtime is required.

“They think that people up in Sacramento know more than people on the ground and the experts who have provided this data,” said Markovich.

One issue that the State’s negotiating team has consistently failed to provide meaningful input on is staff cell phones.

“Regarding cell phones, we’ve brought evidence that this issue goes back at least to 2015, and there’s been silence that whole time,” said Silas Wagner. “They deny that this is an issue and ignore the reality we live with.”

Working with students on field trips, to the store, and to and from their houses, staff have to use their personal phones and are encouraged to do so. The security of the staff’s personal information is a risk for teaching assistants and residential counselors, who are required to distribute their personal information to students, parents, and coworkers.

Workers at California Deaf Schools don’t have consistent distribution and access to resources like phones, video phones, and other resources across classifications. We are not supported by the State while we are working out and about with students. This is an unacceptable situation for all involved, according to Silas Wagner, a Unit 20 bargaining team member working at California School for the Deaf (CSD), Riverside.

“We have shown them stacks of data and reporting,” said Wagner. “The sad part is, when they say this can be resolved at the local level, we’ve made the efforts to do it that way. We’ve taken these issues to Joint Labor Management Committees (JLMCs) and to management directly. Nothing has happened.”

At hearing schools, the state provides walkie-talkies to staff, which cannot be used by any Deaf staff working at the Deaf schools. This obvious problem has not been addressed by management or the State’s bargaining team.

“The Unit 20 lead negotiator for the State repeatedly says she’s concerned that these issues are ongoing, but she still refuses to make a change,” said Wagner. “Something is not right here on the State’s side.”

The fight for respect in the workplace does not end at the negotiating table. Unit 20 employees are prepared to exert their rights in the workplace to demand an end to the policies which have created an untenable situation for workers and families across the state.

“Right now, it’s summer break,” said Wagner. “Our members are planning to stop using their personal phones at the start of the school year to protest this unfair policy. We’ll be grieving this every time it happens; we’ll be fighting this continuously; and we’ll be participating in the Union’s escalating actions as we address the failures of the State’s bargaining team.”

Unit 20 will return to the table as needed to complete a great contract for our members. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

If you have questions about actions planned at your worksite, contact the Member Resource Center (MRC) at 866.471.SEIU (7348), Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 26, 2023

This weekend, and again today, the Unit 20 bargaining team worked with the State to advance the Medical and Social Services workers we represent. While we made progress, the State continued to show frustrating bargaining behavior that didn’t align with our efforts to make positive change.

“All we’ve been seeing is the State wanting rollover language or to take rights away,” said Unit 20 Vice Chair Sarah Cooper. “They’re unwilling to do the back-and-forth; they want what they want, and it’s a contentious environment.”

Another example: Our fight to update our uniform allowance is being stifled; the State doesn’t seem concerned about a dollar figure that hasn’t been changed in 21 years.

Here are the tentative agreements we reached on Sunday and Monday; all are rollovers:

  • 8.27.20 Dependent Care Leave (Unit 20)
  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20)
  • 8.28 Continuing Education
  • 14.21 – Classification study

We made the following proposals to the State:

  • 12.9.20 Overtime Meal Allowance (Unit 20) – New language proposed for employees to receive additional meal allowance when required to work extended periods of time
  • 12.11.20 Uniform Replacement Allowance (Unit 20) – New language to raise the uniform allowance
  • 19.6.20 Show Up Time (Unit 20) – New language to hold management responsible to compensate an employee for four hours, if the staffing office doesn’t inform the employee they are not needed (this also applies to any trainings scheduled on an employee’s day off)
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – New language to strengthen the swap process for employees
  • 19.XXX.20 Floating (Unit 20) – New language to ensure that BU 20 employees aren’t made to cover work shifts for other bargaining unit classifications
  • 19.XXXX.20 Overtime Distribution Task Force for Fremont Special Schools (Unit 20) – New language to establish a Joint Management Labor Task Force to create a procedure on overtime distribution procedure for the Special Schools in Fremont
  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20) – Countered with rollover

Here are the proposals we received Sunday and Monday from the State:

  • 7.XX.20 Student Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors, Night Attendants and Teaching Assistants) (Unit 20) – The State rejected our efforts to secure a 40-hour week for our members, even if students are on holiday

We received four proposed rollovers

  • 8.27.20 Dependent Care Leave (Unit 20) – The State proposed rollover
  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20) – The State rejected the Union’s proposal to include the School for the Deaf, Fremont in this language and proposed rollover
  • 20.15.20 Post and Bid Procedure for CNA Positions, CDCR (CDCR, CCHCS, DJJ) (Unit 20) – The State proposed rollover
  • 20.16.20 Post and Bid Procedure for Dental Assistant Positions, CDCR (Unit 20) – The State proposed rollover

A number of outstanding proposals remain, mostly economic issues that have been moved to the master table. We also continue our joint effort with Unit 17 to resolve and advance our issues with mandatory and voluntary overtime.

With just a few days remaining before our contract expires, Unit 20 is on standby to meet once again with the State to resolve outstanding issues. When we meet, you’ll read it here first!

To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

Winning a good contract starts with you. Don’t just belong to the Union, participate.  Sign up for our Silent Protest March in Sacramento on June 29.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 19, 2023

We’re reporting today on two Unit 20 bargaining sessions—held on June 16 and 19.

While there was evidence of some movement at the Unit 20 table in these sessions, there remains a serious frustration with the State’s approach to bargaining with just ten days remaining before our current contract expires. Just today, we spent more than ten hours with the State’s team, and we reached no tentative agreements on behalf of the Medical and Social Service Specialists we represent. And that’s on the State, according to Silas Wagner, a member of our Unit 20 team who works at one of our state’s Special Schools:

“We feel that today’s session was a big waste of time,” said Wagner. “Our team has spent a great amount of effort crafting our proposals in response to our members’ priorities, yet, the State remains disengaged and less than fully responsive.”

“We’re being asked to give them information we presented over a month ago, multiple times. We have given them thoughtful input, and it seems that they’ve forgotten it.” Wagner added.

In just one example of the team’s frustration at the State’s response, after our initial SSA proposal, the State wanted to make sure our members were aware that the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is available. For members who are struggling to pay for meals, for medication, and for a roof over their head, “EAP is not a solution,” said Wagner. Yes, EAP can provide assistance to members in crisis but the real help would be if the State would provide a livable wage. When discussing SSAs, BU 20 Chair Heather Markovich asked the State “What are your state employee’s worth to you?”

At the same time, the State’s bargaining team is floating verbal responses to our proposals, rather than the traditional approach, which is we propose on paper, they should respond on paper.

“The State’s bargaining leadership is not listening to our members concerns with our new language proposals and is pushing back, offering instead to say ‘no’ or to take the easier approach by rolling over existing language, but we are not done fighting“ said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 bargaining chair.

Here’s a look at the progress Unit 20 made in the June 16 bargaining session:

Our Unit 20 team proposed to “roll over” (maintain previous contract language) on three sections:

  • 8.28.20 Continuing Education Leave (Unit 20)
  • 11.16.20 Alternate Range (AR) 40 (Unit 20)
  • 14.21.20 Classification Studies (Unit 20)

We reached two tentative agreements with the State on this day, both of which maintain previous contract wins from past campaigns:

  • 8.24.20 Department of Developmental Services/LVN Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20)
     
  • 8.30.20 Family Crisis Leave Bank, State Special Schools (Unit 20)

The State made one proposal to Unit 20:

  • 12.11.20 Uniform Replacement Allowance (Unit 20) – State proposed rollover language

On June 19, we achieved the following:

Unit 20’s team made the following proposals to the State:

  • 19.32.20 Overtime Distribution at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (Unit 20) – proposed new language to include the Fremont School for the Deaf
     
  • 10.38.20 Rest Areas (Unit 20) – new language to request that the State provide a refrigerator and microwave in break areas for all employees
     
  • 20.XXXX.X Assignment Preference Teaching Assistants– Special Schools (Unit 20) – new proposal to request that Teaching Assistants take a survey annually to request assignments for the school year so they have some choice in what they do each year (member choice)
     
  • 20.11.20 Post and Bid Procedure for CNA Positions: California Veterans Homes (Unit 20) – added new language to existing proposal to strengthen the article section
     
  • 20.18.20 Post and Bid Task Force for Medical Assistants at CHCF Stockton (Unit 20) – updated proposal to include all MAs statewide, not just at CHCF Stockton
     
  • 8.22.20 DSH Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – counterproposal with rollover language as the team didn’t want to accept the State’s language due to negative impact
     
  • 10.5.20 Safety Orientation (Unit 20) – counterproposal to ensure Unit 20 employees have management support until job orientation has been completed
     
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20) – counterproposal to ensure Unit 20 employees have management support until job orientation has been completed

Unit 20 received the following proposals from the State:

  • 20.12.20 Post and Bid Procedure for Vacant LVN Positions, CDCR (Unit 20) – State proposed rollover language (upcoming joint meeting with Unit 17)
     
  • 19.9.20 Exchange of Time Off – Multi-Shift Operations (Unit 20) – State proposed rollover language (we proposed looser rules, RNs psy techs, probation)
     
  • 19.13.20 Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed new language that the team will need to review before responding
     
  • 19.14.20 Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20) – State proposed new language that the team will need to review before responding
     
  • 19.15.20 Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed new language that the team will need to review before responding
     
  • 19.21.20 Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed a new number system to mimic SEIU (19.21.20); other than that it’s rollover language
     
  • 19.22.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20) – State proposed a new number system to mimic SEIU (19.22.20); other than that it’s rollover language
     
  • 19.23.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20) – State proposed a new number system to mimic SEIU (19.23.20); other than that it’s rollover language
     
  • 19.XX.XX Mixed Shift Work Weeks (Unit 20) – a new proposal that the State rejected
     
  • 20.XX.XX Post and Bid Task Force for Pharmacy Technicians at CHCF Stockton (Unit 20) – a new proposal that the State rejected

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Unit 20 will return to the table on Monday, June 26. With just 10 days remaining before our contract expires, look for possible additional bargaining sessions through the weekend.

To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

If you are, help support bargaining teams by purpling up on Wednesday and attending our upcoming rally in Los Angeles on June 22.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 12, 2023

Negotiations continued today with the State after SEIU Local 1000’s march in Sacramento on June 8th.

The Unit 20 team went to the table on June 1st to negotiate with the State on the ongoing issues that our members have vocally demanded as we fight for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers.

“We started off slow today and we didn’t start until the afternoon, while we usually start at 11,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Bargaining Chair. In spite of technical issues on the State’s side, negotiations led to responses on a number of Unit 20’s proposals.

SEIU Local 1000 presented the following proposals to the State’s negotiating team today –

  • 8.23.20 Department of Veterans Affairs Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – counterproposal sent back where the State accepted our language and added some of their own that benefits Unit 20 classifications
     
  • 10.20.20 Assaultive Response Training (Unit 20) – counterproposal sent back where the State accepted our language and added some of their own
     
  • 7.XX.20 Student Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors, Night Attendants and Teaching Assistants) (Unit 20) – new proposal to ensure Unit 20 Night Attendants, Residential Counselors, and Teaching Assistants can receive a 40 hour workweek when there are student holidays (which doesn’t always happen presently)
     
  • 7.2.20 Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors and Night Attendants) (Unit 20) – counterproposal sent back where Unit 20 is accepting rollover language as the State wouldn’t accept BU 20’s language updates
     
  • X.XX.20 State Issued Cell Phones – The Schools for the Deaf (Fremont and Riverside) (Unit 20) – new proposal that will ensure that Unit 20 employees at the Schools for the Deaf (Freemont and Riverside) will be issued state cell phones to communicate with each other so they don’t have to use their personal cell phones

The State was able to reach the following tentative agreements today with the Union –

  • 8.23.20 Department of Veterans Affairs Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – counterproposal where the State accepted our language and added some of their own that benefits Unit 20 classifications
     
  • 10.20.20 Assaultive Response Training (Unit 20) – counterproposal where the State accepted our language and added some of their own
     
  • 7.2.20 Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors and Night Attendants) (Unit 20) – rollover language
     
  • 12.18.20 License or Certificate Renewal Fees (Unit 20) – rollover language

Additionally, the State offered counter proposals for the following articles today –

  • 8.22.20 DSH Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) Vacation Scheduling (Unit 20) – the State countered with some new language that the team will review and respond to accordingly
     
  • 20.11.20 Post and Bid Procedure for CNA Positions: California Veterans Homes (Unit 20) – the State countered with some new language that the team will review and respond to accordingly

Finally, the State rejected two SEIU proposals today –

  • 20.XX.X Shift/Day Off Preference Teaching Assistants– Special Schools (Unit 20)
  • 8.XX.20 CDCR-CCHCS Vacation Scheduling – Pharmacy Technicians (Unit 20)

One issue that was addressed today was negotiations around Unit 20 employees at the Special Schools of California regarding cell phone usage. SEIU Local 1000-represented employees at the School for the Deaf are prohibited from using their personal cell phones per the school’s policy, however, management is requesting personal cell phone numbers to communicate via text. “We are asking the State to provide them with a work cell phone, to help in their work, and to protect their personal information,” said Markovich. “When they’re off duty, no one else should have access to their personal information.”

Although the bargaining team did receive several responses today, this has not yet met the expectation of the bargaining team, who are expecting more substantive proposals and language on post and bid, swaps, and mandatory overtime.

There is more work to be done to address the issues that Unit 20 members have prioritized in bargaining surveys and at town halls across the state.

“We haven’t gotten it all back, for example, we still need our vacation scheduling,” said Markovich. “We gave a lot of information, but we need more of the meat on serious issues. The State’s lead negotiator offered to meet with us on Thursday to address some of our outstanding articles.”

“We’re definitely moving,” said team member Oluwadamilola Kamson.  “The table was different today, and the State’s team was ready with proposals. My feeling is that we’re moving and that we got some of the TAs we wanted back. “We hope that we can continue this to catch up on the rest of the TAs and get our proposals returned.”

This movement comes after weeks of sluggish responses from the State’s negotiating team and a fight to receive back any of a large number of outstanding proposals.

“We’re finally starting to see movement from the State,” said Vice Chair Sarah Cooper. “Although we’re still waiting to hear back on some of our critical issues., it’s a good sign that the State is willing to meet with us on additional days this week to get this done before our contract expires.”

“I’m just hoping that next week we see the State return some of our outstanding proposals,” said Markovich. “If these issues weren’t important, we wouldn’t have proposed them.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, June 19. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

If you are, help support bargaining teams by purpling up on Wednesday and attending our upcoming rally in Los Angeles on June 22.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, June 5, 2023

There was some light at the end of the tunnel today in contract negotiations between our Unit 20 bargaining team and the State.

“It’s the most productive meeting we’ve had; we’re seeing a break in the log jam of unanswered proposals,” said Sarah Cooper, Vice Chair of Unit 20. “With three sessions remaining, we hope to bring home a good contract for our represented employees.”

Still, some of the most important proposals for our members—among them, post and bid and mandatory overtime—haven’t been responded to, and we continue to press for resolution.

As part of today’s session, we reached tentative agreement on a number of contract sections:

We won stronger language on 13.12.20 – Employment Opportunities, which will modernize the way the department posts and communicates job openings available to our members.

Following up on a joint commitment we made with the State during the last bargaining cycle, we reached tentative agreement on 8.25.20 – CDCR/CCHCS Vacation Scheduling and solidified our ability to reasonably schedule time off.

We reached tentative agreement on 20.13.20 – Shift/Day Off Preference of Assignment – Schools for the Deaf.  It preserves our previous, hard-won contract language.

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Unit 20 will return to the table on Monday, June 12. In addition, we’ve made it clear to State negotiators we’re ready to meet at any time to get our work done. As Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich said today, “We’ve got employees on this team who often work 16-hour days, and we’re good to go.”

To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Thursday, June 1, 2023

The Unit 20 team went to the table on June 1 to negotiate with the State on the issues that have been impacting workers across the state as we fight for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers.

BU 20 proposed the following new language to the State during today’s session:

  • 11.xx.20 Alternate Range Criteria Adjustment for Registered Dental Assistants

The State’s negotiating team proposed the following rollover sections to our bargaining team:

  • 10.38.20 Rest Areas (Unit 20)
  • 12.23.20 Laboratory Services and Deliveries (Unit 20)
  • 13.31.20   20/20 Programs (Unit 20)
  • 13.30.20 Orientation (Unit 20)
  • 13.32.20 Education and Training Opportunities (Unit 20)
  • 13.33.20 Mandatory Training (Unit 20)
  • 13.34.20 Non-Mandatory Training (Unit 20)

Additionally, the State offered a counterproposal to the following sections:

  • 10.20.20 Assaultive Response Training (Unit 20)

The State agreed to SEIU Local 1000’s language change and added additional language, which the BU 20 team will review and respond to the State at the appropriate time.

  • 7.2.20 Holidays – State Special Schools (Residential Counselors and Night Attendants) (Unit 20) the State did not accept our language changes and countered with rollover.

Finally, a tentative agreement was reached today on the following new language section:

  • 10.25.20 Infectious Disease Control (Unit 20)

The State did reach a tentative agreement on the language change proposed by Local 1000, in section 10.25.20, expanding the infection disease control language to include CCHCS and CDE. This gives our members the right to information on outbreaks in their workplace.

Additionally, the team presented new language adjusting the range criteria for Registered Dental Assistants. These underpaid and understaffed workers have demanded a pathway to reach their maximum pay in a shorter amount of time. The team proposed new language to the State today to change the amount of time it takes to go from one range to another range from 10 years to 4 years. This was in direct response to the survey feedback and town halls that were attended by the Registered Dental Assistants.

“Previously, Registered Dental Assistants took about 15 years to get to their max pay,” said Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “We presented to the State that all dental assistants should have the same process for reaching their maximum pay.”

“The State needs to take action on our articles,” said team member Silas Wagner. “We’ll be back at the table on Monday with the same demands, and we will continue to fight for what our members deserve. We aren’t going to roll over in the face of delays.”

While the State presented the team with 8 rollover proposals today, there continue to be delays in negotiations on critical issues faced by Unit 20 workers.

“We need to negotiate over the exchange of time language, vacation time, post and bid, and mandatory overtime,” said Markovich. “We need the meat, not the crumbs.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 22, 2023

While our Unit 20 bargaining team continues to work with the State by presenting proposals that advance the wages and working conditions of our Medical and Social Services Specialists, the State remains largely unresponsive to those proposals.

“Negotiation is a two-way street, an exchange of information, and we’re still waiting,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Chair. “We’re doing our part, but without feedback on our proposals, there’s no opportunity for progress, and we’re not solving the issues facing our members.”

The numbers are stark: to date, there are 39 outstanding proposals that remain unanswered. We’ve reached tentative agreement with the State on just 12 contract sections, and one more is in progress.

We’ve told the State that time is running out. With no bargaining scheduled for next Monday (Memorial Day), only 4 regularly scheduled sessions remain before the contract expires.

“We’ve asked the State what they’d do if the roles were reversed and asked them to imagine that they weren’t getting the input necessary to respond to,” added Chair Markovich. “Their response was, basically, ‘we’re doing our due diligence’ without any promise of a change of behavior.”

Still, our team is moving forward. We reached tentative agreement on three proposals, a number of weeks after we presented them:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks (Unit 20)
  • 12.22.20 – State Special School Field Trip Expenses (Unit 20)
  • 15.4.20 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 20)

These “rollovers” preserve and protect rights from previous contract wins. We’re awaiting a response on 39 additional proposals.

There will be no bargaining on Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day). Unit 20 returns to the table in two weeks, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 22, 2023

While our Unit 20 bargaining team continues to work with the State by presenting proposals that advance the wages and working conditions of our Medical and Social Services Specialists, the State remains largely unresponsive to those proposals.

“Negotiation is a two-way street, an exchange of information, and we’re still waiting,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Chair. “We’re doing our part, but without feedback on our proposals, there’s no opportunity for progress, and we’re not solving the issues facing our members.”

The numbers are stark: to date, there are 39 outstanding proposals that remain unanswered. We’ve reached tentative agreement with the State on just 12 contract sections, and one more is in progress.

We’ve told the State that time is running out. With no bargaining scheduled for next Monday (Memorial Day), only 4 regularly scheduled sessions remain before the contract expires.

“We’ve asked the State what they’d do if the roles were reversed and asked them to imagine that they weren’t getting the input necessary to respond to,” added Chair Markovich. “Their response was, basically, ‘we’re doing our due diligence’ without any promise of a change of behavior.”

Still, our team is moving forward. We reached tentative agreement on three proposals, a number of weeks after we presented them:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks (Unit 20)
  • 12.22.20 – State Special School Field Trip Expenses (Unit 20)
  • 15.4.20 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 20)

These “rollovers” preserve and protect rights from previous contract wins. We’re awaiting a response on 39 additional proposals.

There will be no bargaining on Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day). Unit 20 returns to the table in two weeks, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 22, 2023

While our Unit 20 bargaining team continues to work with the State by presenting proposals that advance the wages and working conditions of our Medical and Social Services Specialists, the State remains largely unresponsive to those proposals.

“Negotiation is a two-way street, an exchange of information, and we’re still waiting,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 Chair. “We’re doing our part, but without feedback on our proposals, there’s no opportunity for progress, and we’re not solving the issues facing our members.”

The numbers are stark: to date, there are 39 outstanding proposals that remain unanswered. We’ve reached tentative agreement with the State on just 12 contract sections, and one more is in progress.

We’ve told the State that time is running out. With no bargaining scheduled for next Monday (Memorial Day), only 4 regularly scheduled sessions remain before the contract expires.

“We’ve asked the State what they’d do if the roles were reversed and asked them to imagine that they weren’t getting the input necessary to respond to,” added Chair Markovich. “Their response was, basically, ‘we’re doing our due diligence’ without any promise of a change of behavior.”

Still, our team is moving forward. We reached tentative agreement on three proposals, a number of weeks after we presented them:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks (Unit 20)
  • 12.22.20 – State Special School Field Trip Expenses (Unit 20)
  • 15.4.20 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 20)

These “rollovers” preserve and protect rights from previous contract wins. We’re awaiting response on 39 additional proposals.

There will be no bargaining on Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day). Unit 20 returns to the table in two weeks, on Monday, June 5. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

And be sure to save your spot for the upcoming June 8 March to the Governor’s mansion here.

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 15, 2023

Our bargaining teams have returned to the table this week, fighting for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers. Our Bargaining Unit 20 negotiating team went to the table on May 15 to negotiate financial matters that impact these vulnerable and underpaid classifications. Subject matter experts in the unit discussed the issues they experience in the workplace and explained in detail to the State the consequences of years of short staffing and low pay.

During today’s bargaining session, the team proposed four sections for “rollover,” maintaining important workplace protections secured in previous contracts:

  • 11.5.20 – Release of Paychecks
  • 11.61.20 – Split Shift Differential
  • 11.63.20 – Certified Nursing Assistant/EMT Pay Differential
  • 12.18.20 – License or Certificate Renewal Fees

We proposed the four sections below with new language to reflect changes we want to see to our contract:

  • 10.5.20 – Safety Orientation
  • 11.1.20 – Special Salary Adjustments
  • 11.60.20 – LVN Recruitment and Retention
  • 11.62.20 – Dental Assistant Registration Differential

Additionally, we made a counter proposal in response to the State’s first counter proposal for the following section:

  • 13.12.20 – Employment Opportunities

Finally, the State and the Union reached a tentative agreement on the following rollover sections:

  • 19.18.20 – Rescinding Approved Time Off
  • 19.31.20 – Split Shifts

Language proposed today about safety orientation by the bargaining team reflected the same concept as BU 17. The bargaining teams are trying to align the language of Units 17 and 20. “We work side-by-side with each other,” said Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “LVNs, CNAs, RNs, and Medical Assistants working on the same unit should have the same protections.”

Today, the bargaining team proposed special salary adjustments for Unit 20 employees, asking for individual pay raises for some of the most impacted and lowest paid classifications. “We let them know our members should not have to suffer anxiety about homelessness or paying for food instead of rent,” said Markovich.

These issues are at the heart of the State’s current crisis of vacancies in positions across California. “If they don’t pay and respect us, they will run out of employees,” said Markovich.

“If the wages are not raised, no one will come work for the state.”

The focus at the table on economics is giving voice to the concerns of state workers who have struggled for recognition of their needs for years. Experts spoke about their experiences in job roles across California, including a Senior Clinical Laboratory Technologist, an X-ray technician, and SSA-I (ASL interpreters) from the Department of Rehabilitation and School for the Deaf in Riverside.

“We are dealing with ASL proficiency,” said bargaining team member Silas Wagner. “It takes years of experience to become an interpreter with the skills necessary for the unique needs and educations levels of our deaf state employees. Someone who has 6 months experience, which is listed in the job description, will be woefully unprepared and overwhelmed on the job.”

These jobs are in-demand positions; not everyone can be an interpreter and years of experience are needed. The State knows this but has refused to pay these qualified professionals what they’re worth. “They work hard,” said Wagner. “Those in these roles need to be taken seriously.”

The State also heard from a Senior Clinical Lab Technologist and an X-Ray Technician in regard to how their low pay has impacted new hires and retention. The high vacancy rate has increased their workload; instead of covering one facility they have to cover multiple facilities. The Senior Clinical Lab Technologist must have a license by the State Department of Health Services. In order to obtain that license, they must have a bachelor’s degree and a major in clinical laboratory science. Due to the low pay, most people with this license seek higher paying positions outside of state service.

Similarly, the X-Ray Technicians also have a high proficiency level for their job along with a license. Due to low staffing levels, they also service multiple facilities while they were originally hired to service just one facility. This also causes patients to be transferred to outside facilities if there is no X-Ray Technician on duty as they are at another facility. The cost of transporting patients along with their escorts is extremely high, which is costing the state unnecessary funds.

In the CNA classification alone, there are 749 vacant jobs across the state. Uncompetitive wages have meant that the state can’t hire, further exacerbating the problems. In order to solve the state’s financial issues regarding their workforce, Unit 20 employees need to be paid a fair and competitive wage.

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, May 22. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.

Bargaining Unit 17 & 20 Recap: Tuesday, May 9, 2023

Happy Nurses’ Week from your Bargaining Unit 17 (BU 17) and Bargaining Unit 20 (BU 20) Bargaining Unit Negotiating Committees (BUNC). While we celebrate the work nurses do across the country, SEIU Local 1000-represented nurses went to the table on May 9 to focus on Mandatory Overtime and Voluntary Overtime, which affect our nurses statewide.

Of primary concern to almost all state nurses is the issue of Mandatory Overtime (MOT). “This morning, BU 17 and 20 together met with the State to pass our voluntary and mandatory overtime article sections,” said Unit 17 Chair Vanessa Seastrong. “Today at the table a large volume of new proposals were presented from both bargaining teams to address these issues. We passed a total of 10 proposals, 4 for Unit 17 and 6 for Unit 20,” said Seastrong. “As we expected, the State received these MOT article sections but didn’t ask many clarifying questions, and we are still awaiting a counter proposal.”

BU 17 proposed the following article sections containing new language regarding Mandatory Overtime (MOT):

  • Article 19.14.17 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.15.17 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling (Excluding CDCR) (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.22.17 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.23.17 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling (Excluding CDCR) (Unit 17)

BU 20 proposed these article sections addressing MOT for their unit as well:

  • Article 19.13.20 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.14.20 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.15.20 – Overtime Mandatory Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.21.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – Excluding CDCR LVNs and CNAs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.22.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services LVNs (Unit 20)
  • Article 19.23.20 – Overtime Voluntary Scheduling – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and California Correctional Health Care Services CNAs (Unit 20)

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Currently, a holdover of less than two hours is not counted as mandatory overtime. “This is an inconvenience and demoralizing for many of our members,” said BU 17 Alternate Vice Chair Bob Mutebi. “An hour means a lot of someone’s day. Our new proposal is to have a holdover of one hour to be counted as MOT.”

These issues led to the team proposing a change to the existing MOT language. “We proposed that the State reduce the number of mandatory overtime shifts by one a year until we get to zero,” said BU 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “We also proposed language to strengthen the voluntary overtime process.”

Currently, BU 17 RNs can be mandated for two overtime shifts per month, while BU 20 CNAs and LVNs have three. “We want to reduce this down to 1 for RNs and 2 for LVNs and CNAs,” said Seastrong. “We would continue to reduce MOT by one shift per year until 2025 when Unit 17 and 20 will both have zero.”

Other changes to the article sections strengthen contract language so that our workers can take the shifts that they want to work and gives state employees preference over external registry. “We want the state to address these article sections,” said Seastrong. “For the last three years, we’ve been in a Mandatory Overtime Task Force, and nothing was done. Without language to make them get this problem under control, we don’t think this issue will be solved. The state has violated this agreement in the past, so stronger language and protections are needed.”

Another ongoing issue addressed during the joint session was language proposed by the units that ensured that BU 17 and BU 20 nurses cannot be mandated into another bargaining unit position. “Unit 17 and Unit 20 are being mandated into other BU positions. “We are being used to plug gaps in the state’s workforce,” said Mutebi.

“Today, state workers stood up and told the State that this practice accounts for the huge turnover in the state’s workforce,” said Mutebi. “This represents a huge disrespect for our LVNs, who are forced to cover for workers making more money when they themselves are not paid equally,” said Markovich.

To ensure that these protections are enforced, bargaining units proposed language that includes penalties for the state when these terms are violated. “We included in this proposal that when mandatory overtime shifts are required of state workers after we bring them down to zero, the state will have to pay a penalty of double-time for any mandated shift,” said Markovich.

The two units worked together to present these major proposals to the State. These issues have been ongoing for years while managers have ignored the problem. By joining together, the two units were able to support each other and provide insight to the State regarding the impacts on nurses. “Mandatory overtime has a huge impact on nursing staff, so we have to come together to fight this issue, because it affects all of us, especially after all of us were working mandatory overtime during COVID,” said BU 20 Vice Chair Sarah Cooper.

The fight for this important protection is on. “The nurses’ actions in the workplace are what brought the State to the table on this issue in 2019,” said Seastrong. “We need to see that same energy now to move the State to take our proposals seriously. We need actions in the workplace so the State can see how bad the nurses want mandatory overtime to go away.”

“In 24-hour facilities, there is no separation between these units,” said Mutebi. “Neither of us can say our job is complete without each other. When we come together at the table, it shows the synergy of these two units fighting the injustices that the state is trying to put on our membership.”

In addition to article sections passed during the joint session, Unit 17 proposed the following rollover sections:

  • Article 19.4.17 – Meal Periods (Unit 17) 
  • Article 19.6.17 – Show Up Time (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.7.17 – Report Preparation Time (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.9.17 – Exchange of Days Off (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.16.17 – Change in Shift Assignment (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.17.17 – Mixed Shift Work Weeks (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.19.17 – Work Week Group (WWG) Definitions (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.24.17 – Floating (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.25.17 – Travel Time (Unit 17)
  • Article 19.26.17 – Workweek Correctional Institutions (Unit 17)

Finally, the State offered tentative agreements to the following article sections.

  • Article 8.13.17 – Court Appearances and/or Subpoenas (Excludes Unit 17)
  • Article 13.2.17 – Informal Performance Discussions (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.6.17 – Performance Appraisal (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.9.17 – Letters of Instruction (LOI)/Work Improvement Discussion (WID) (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.12.17 – Employment Opportunities (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.28.17 – Education and Training Opportunities and Resources (Unit 17)
  • Article 13.29.17 – Research Projects (Unit 17)
  • Article 14.4.17 – Duty Statements/Post Orders and Work Instructions (Unit 17)
  • Article 15.4.17 – Employee Opportunity Transfer (Unit 17)

You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

After their morning session bargaining alongside Unit 20, Unit 17 had an active day at the table, focusing on rollover language. “It was a busy day on our end,” said Unit 17 Chair Vanessa Seastrong.

“We have given the State 61 article sections of new language and rollover, and we have only received 18 rollover back in total,” said Seastrong. “While receiving the TAs today was a good sign, the State still needs to start dealing with our new language and not just rollover. We have a number of easy article sections with simple changes that are still under review by the State.”

While the State moves through rollover language, SEIU Local 1000 members are ready to fight for a contract that represents the needs identified in their bargaining surveys and Town Hall meetings.

“We’re hoping that the State will come back and begin the negotiations of bargaining, not just tentative agreements for rollovers,” said Seastrong. “We want to get into the details of language changes. We are focused on action to move the State. Nurses are ready in workplaces across the state to take action to support our bargaining team.”

Unit 17’s next meeting with the State to win a contract that Respects Us, Protects Us, and Pays Us is set for May 16. To read about what happened in Monday’s Bargaining Unit 11, 15, 20, and 21 sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today

Bargaining Unit 20 – Recap: Monday, May 8, 2023

Our bargaining teams are back at the table this week, fighting for a contract that respects, protects, and pays all SEIU Local 1000 represented state workers. Our Bargaining Unit 20 (BU 20) Bargaining Unit Negotiating Team, or BUNC, went to the table on May 8 to negotiate with the State over the unique challenges faced by Medical & Social Services Specialists working for the state. With subject matter experts and members from the State Special Schools presenting on issues in their workplaces, we are showing the State the leadership role they play in providing services to the public.

During today’s bargaining session, BU 20 proposed four sections for “rollover,” maintaining important workplace protections secured in previous contracts.

Additionally, we proposed four articles with new language to reflect changes we want to see to our contract:

  • Article 7.2.20 – Holidays- State Special Schools
  • Article 11.2.20 – State Special School Recruitment and Retention Differentials
  • Article 19.32.20 – Overtime Distribution at the California State Special Schools
  • Article 20.13.20 – Shifts/Day off Preference of Assignment Counselors – Special Schools
  • Article 20.XX. X – Shifts/Day off Preference of Assignment Teaching Assistants – Special Schools

Finally, the State agreed to the following contract sections, achieving a tentative agreement as we continue bargaining:

  • Article 9.19.20 – Light/Limited Duty Assignments
  • Article 11.19.20 – Recruitment and Retention 
  • Article 20.17.20 – Post and Bid Procedure for Residential Care Specialist (RCS) Positions: California Veterans Homes

 You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

“We had a pretty good day,” said Bargaining Unit 20 Chair Heather Markovich. “Today we focused on the School for the Deaf in Fremont and Riverside along with the School for the Blind in Fremont. We asked the State to include new language for a recruitment and retention differential that raises the dollar amount for people currently receiving this in BU 20.”

After addressing rollover language, BUNC member Silas Wagner presented on the ongoing financial crisis for workers in the Bay Area. With inflation rising alongside rent and housing costs, workers are in crisis at the California School for the Deaf in Riverside and Fremont along with the California School for the Blind in Fremont, as well as the communities surrounding these schools.

“In my presentation, I talked about the importance of Deaf culture and Deaf community,” said Wagner. “We want to live in the cities where our Deaf schools are.  These cities have become unaffordable and the Deaf community is disappearing. By living near the schools where we work, we are able to create a Deaf community in which Deaf students are able to thrive.”

However, the State has neglected to address the issues of low wages and increased cost of living faced by the Deaf community in Fremont for many years. “Our classifications are some of the lowest paid, and I wanted to highlight how these low wages are impacting the Deaf community,” said Wagner. “We want people to live near the school and keep our community intact. To put a roof over your head in most situations costs more than people are paid. Everyone’s in the red in Fremont; Unit 20 members can’t afford small studio apartments.”

While cost of living is a crisis across the state, it is particularly impacting workers and community members around these schools. “The cost of living may not be the state’s fault,” said Wagner. “But they need to face the reality that the cost of living is not met by the salary we are provided. Fremont is the most expensive city in California. The second is San Jose. It’s shocking to see that this is where our community is trying to survive without the support of the state.”

These impacts can be mitigated if the State listens to their union workforce’s demands for change in our next contract. Our subject matter experts presented on the issues each of their classifications face, including night attendants, residential counselors, teaching assistants, and sign language interpreters.

“We had representatives from each of the classifications talk about the financial struggles that are associated with Bay Area living and how the salary affects the ability of members to maintain their physical, mental, and emotional health. It will impact the services provided to the children going to the Blind and Deaf schools,” said Wagner. “They talked about the love and commitment that they have for the students, sharing their knowledge about Deaf culture.”

 “I really want to thank the subject matter experts for joining today,” said Wagner. “We are so grateful for the support from the team from the State Special Schools for supporting each other and their coworkers and all the effort they put into their presentations today.”

The fight for respect, protection, and pay requires that all state workers stand together in our demands for a strong contract. Bargaining Unit 20 members spoke with a unified voice at the table and helped show the State that our members are united in our struggle.

Unit 20 returns to the table Tuesday, May 9 along with BU 17 to discuss overtime and next week, on Monday, May 15. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, click here for our Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org.

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today

Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, May 1, 2023

We are entering our third week of bargaining with the State for a contract that respects, protects, and pays the workers who have kept California running through chaotic and unprecedented times. Our Unit 20 (BU 20) Bargaining Unit Negotiating Committee (BUNC) went to the table on May 1st, International Worker’s Day, prepared to fight for our members and the safety and security of the people they serve.

“We passed a lot of language over to the State for approval, including vacation scheduling language from the task forces, as well as making minor tweaks to language around infection control, assaultive response training which includes de-escalation techniques. We also proposed expanding existing language on infectious diseases training to the California Department of Education (CDE) as well.”

These are all meaningful changes that respond to the major disruptions that the State of California has gone through over the last three years of the pandemic. The State, however, does not share the same urgency for our member’s needs.

Unit 20 has 11 outstanding provisions from previous weeks, not including the 5 additional rollovers and 7 new proposals passed today, pending responses from the State. “I felt like there wasn’t sincerity on the State’s part,” said Heather Markovich, Unit 20 BUNC Chair. “We started the day and asked what they had for us. They told us they had one rollover.”

After multiple weeks, the State is still slow to respond to these issues or even ask clarifying questions. “It’s hard to say what’s going on behind closed doors,” said Markovich. “When we asked them if they had any questions or comments about what we sent, they said they were still reviewing.”

Unit 20 was able to reach a Tentative Agreement with the State on one rollover provision from our previous contract, 13.18.20 – Professional Practice. You can read the details of these and all current contract articles at contract.seiu1000.org

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, May 8th. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, click here for our Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org.

If you’re not already an SEIU Local 1000 member, join us today.

Unit 20 Bargaining Summary: Monday, April 24, 2023

Bargaining has entered its second week for our Unit 20 Bargaining Unit Negotiating Committee (BUNC), representing LVNs, CNAs, Teaching Assistants, Dental Assistants, Registered Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienists, Pharmacy Technicians, Laboratory Technologists, Physical Therapists, Counselors, and many other classifications working across California.

On April 24th, the Unit 20 BUNC went to the table to continue unit-specific negotiations with the State.  We presented four contract articles to the State for “rollover,” signaling our desire that the existing language remains unchanged, keeping in place the hard-won rights from previous contract campaigns. The State agreed, and thus, a “tentative agreement” was reached on these three articles:

5.18.20   –         Labor Management Committee, California School for the Deaf, Riverside
10.32.20 –         Information Regarding Medical Condition
21.22.20 –         Licensure/Certification

The State also returned a proposal from last week on continuing education. “When they asked why this proposal was an issue for us, we went into our surveys and were able to provide specific cases from responding workers,” said BUNC Chair Heather Markovich. “The State was pushing back on costs on this issue, but we wanted them to understand that by increasing the knowledge of our workforce, we can both support the quality care to our patients and the career opportunities workers have.”

In addition, the Unit 20 ream proposed new language today, centered around the Post and Bid procedure, which affects our certified nurse assistants and LVNs in all our locations. “This has a very broad impact,” said Markovich. “The Post and Bid process allows members to choose shifts, work area, and days off based on seniority. This allows our workers to better manage their work-life balance as they see fit. We have multiple people who have spouses or significant others who use the post and bid process so that they can minimize childcare costs, which remain high across the state.”

As we present more and more articles to the State, negotiations will continue to evolve, but our goals are clear. Our members need more support from their employer, and we need to maintain and expand our protections in the workplace. “This meeting was a little more tense than last week,” said Markovich. “They had a lot of questions for us, but we handled it well as a team.” 

The tensions at the table are in part due to our bargaining team holding the State accountable to its workers. After a proposal is passed across the table to the State, their negotiators have a week to review it and respond. “We’re putting a lot more pressure on the State to respond to us,” said Sarah Cooper, BUNC Alternate Vice Chair. “The State sometimes delays passing back counteroffers and tentative agreements. They started the day saying they had nothing to give us and that we may receive one agreed on proposal by the end of the day.”

In spite of the State’s pessimistic outlook, the Unit 20 BUNC was able to use our member’s responses to surveys, town hall meetings, and other comments to keep the meeting productive and fight for our member’s rights. “Heather pushed and demanded answers after they had a week to do their research,” said Cooper. “By the end of the day, we had three rollovers agreed to and proposed new language.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, May 1st. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, click here for our Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org.

If you’re not already an SEIU Local 1000 member, join us today.


Bargaining Unit 20 Recap: Monday, April 17, 2023

After kicking off bargaining for our “master table” session last week, members across the state are making their voices heard as we demand a strong contract that Respects, Protects, and Pays the employees that kept California running for the last three years.

On April 17, Bargaining Unit 20 (BU 20), went to the table to begin their unit-specific negotiations with the State. BU 20, which represents medical and social services specialists, including LVNs, CNAs, Teaching Assistants, Laboratory Technologists, Physical Therapists, and Counselors, has faced some extremely challenging conditions as they navigated COVID-19 and the State and management’s response.

“Members drive this process, and we follow their directions,” said Heather Markovich, Bargaining Unit 20 Chair. “There’s a lot riding on this, but we came in prepared thanks to our research, the strength of our team, and the time we spent getting to understand our strategy. We’re very cohesive.”

During Monday morning’s session, our team presented a number of contract articles for “rollover,” a term you’ll hear used to describe parts of the contract that don’t require negotiation this cycle. Today’s rollover articles include maintaining our Labor Management committee at California School for the Deaf, Riverside; our return-to-work “light/limited duty” program for employees incapacitated due to illness or injury; and a continuation of the Flexible Benefits Program (FlexElect). Setting these protections aside during bargaining ensures that we will be able to address the ongoing issues without risking these workplace protections crucial to medical and social services.

We presented four new proposals in the afternoon that contained new language and new protections for members. Two of these proposals focused on time-off exchanges and continuing our education leave programs, built off existing language to strengthen the protections we have in our worksites.

Additionally, we presented two new proposals designed to address the ongoing problem of mixed shifts. BU 20 represented employees often find themselves working most days on one shift but with some days assigned shifts earlier or later in the day. Additionally, we proposed a task force for pharmacy technicians in Stockton, including post and bid language. If successful, pharmacy technicians could choose their workplace and pick their schedules.

“Our focus is on addressing the issues our members identified in our bargaining surveys, town halls, and meetings at worksites across the state, said Markovich, who works as a Licensed Vocational Nurse at the California Medical Facility. “We’re members just like all of our coworkers. The input from the surveys and town halls leads where we go in negotiations.”

Unit 20 returns to the table next week, on Monday, April 24. To see updates on other bargaining unit contract sessions, please visit the Contract Action Center page at seiu1000.org

There’s real truth to the Local 1000 slogan, Stronger Together. We only win a great contract with a strong Local 1000 membership. So, if you’re not already a member, we encourage you to join us today.